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Economic Well-Being in
Rhode Island

Children most at risk of not achieving their full potential are children who live in poverty. Families in poverty are often not able to meet their basic needs: the cost of food, clothing, housing, health care, and more.

Economic Well-Being IllustrationIncome supports, such as subsidized child care, health care (RIte Care), food assistance and tax credits, can help families with incomes below the federal poverty threshold meet their basic needs.

Poverty is related to every KIDS COUNT indicator. Children in poverty, especially those who experience poverty in early childhood and for extended periods, are more likely to have physical and behavioral health problems, experience difficulty in school, become teen parents, and earn less or be unemployed as adults. Children in poverty are less likely to be enrolled in a child care care center or preschool, more likely to attend schools that lack resources and rigor, and have fewer opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities.

Many working and unemployed families in Rhode Island are eligible for income support services and benefits to help their children grow and thrive. Programs such as health insurance (RIte Care), child care subsidies, tax credits (EITC), nutrition assistance (SNAP and WIC) and cash assistance (RI Works) are available to families with low or moderate incomes. 

Check out our publications

Economic Well-Being indicators from the 2017 Factbook 

Download the complete 2017 Factbook Economic Well-Being Section

Additional indicators from the 2017 Factbook

Special Publications

  • Help for Working and Unemployed Families Resource Sheet, May 2014 
    Many working and unemployed families in Rhode Island are eligible for services and benefits to help support their families. Programs such as health insurance (RIte Care), child care subsidies, tax credits (EITC), nutrition assistance (SNAP and WIC) and cash assistance (RI Works) are available to families with low or moderate incomes. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT has published this resource in English and Spanish to help working and unemployed Rhode Island families access these services and benefits. If you would like to order copies of these publications, please email rikids@rikidscount.org to request them. 

Issue Briefs

  • Child Poverty in Rhode Island, January 2015
    Poverty is an issue affecting children and families in every city and town in Rhode Island. Children in poverty, especially those who experience poverty in early childhood and for extended periods, are more likely to have physical and behavioral health problems, experience difficulty in school, become teen parents, and earn less or be unemployed as adults.Children in poverty are less likely to be enrolled in preschool, more likely to attend schools that lack resources and rigor, and have fewer opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities. 
    Statewide and community-specific child poverty rates are presented in the Issue Brief.
  • Child Poverty in Rhode Island, November 2012

The Early Learning Fact Sheet Series

  • Focus on Evidence-Based Family Home Visiting, October 2015
    Healthy brain development depends on attentive, nurturing caregiving in infancy and early childhood. Research shows that there is a negative impact on brain development when young children do not have consistent, supportive relationships with caregivers and are exposed to “toxic stress.” Providing early and intensive support to families with multiple risk factors improves child development outcomes. This report includes data and information on infants born with key risk factors, and provides a comprehensive overview of Evidence-Based Family Home Visiting Programs in Rhode Island.
  • Focus on The Child Care Assistance Program, 2014 
    Families need child care in order to work and to provide the early education experiences necessary to prepare their children for school. Yet the high cost of child care puts quality care out of reach for many low-income families. This Fact Sheet provides the latest available data, key facts, and recommendations about the Child Care Assistance Program in Rhode Island.

Related Rhode Island KIDS COUNT TV Shows

Related Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Resources

Additional Resources

Rhode Island

National

  • Annie E. Casey Foundation National Data Center – Economic Well-Being Indicators
    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT contributes data to the national KIDS COUNT Data Center, which is managed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.The national KIDS COUNT Data Center connects you to over four million data points about the well-being of children and families in each state and across the country. You can easily access hundreds of indicators related to health, education, employment and income, child welfare, and many other topics. The Data Center is free and available to all.

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT works to improve the health, safety, education, economic security, and development of Rhode Island’s children.

Address

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT
One Union Station
Providence, RI 02903

Contact

401-351-9400
401-351-1758
Email Us

401-351-9400
Email Us

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