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The School Readiness Indicators Initiative: A 17 State Partnership

The School Readiness Indicators Initiative worked with 17 states from 2001 to 2004 to develop a comprehensive set of school readiness indicators to inform public policy for young children and their families. This initiative was sponsored by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and the Ford Foundation. For more information, please explore the links below: 

Background Information About The School Readiness Indicators Initiative

Overview

The School Readiness Indicators Initiative was a multi-state initiative that uses child well-being indicators to build a change agenda in states and local communities in order to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. The task of participating states was to develop a set of child outcome and systems indicators for children from birth through the fourth-grade reading test, an important red flag for children most at-risk for poor long-term outcomes, such as dropping out of school, teen pregnancy, and juvenile crime.

State Teams

The Initiative involved 17 states: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin. State teams worked individually and as a group to develop a comprehensive set of measures to monitor school readiness and service system outcomes for children and families. Each team consisted of multi-agency senior policy and data staff.

National Meetings

National Meetings invited representatives from state teams together to provide peer-to-peer support on indicator development and conceptual issues, data and technology issues, and communications strategies. Our first National Meeting was held October 2001 and the final National Meeting was held in May of 2004.

Residency Roundtables

Residency Roundtables were convened two to four times a year to tackle tough conceptual issues in a focused way. During these roundtables, state leaders and field experts worked together to accelerate progress in priority areas. Our first Residency Roundtable was held April 2002 on the topic of social and emotional development of young children. Our final Residency Roundtable was held in October 2003, where the focus was Birth to Three Indicators.

Technical Assistance

Expert consultants, from the State Early Childhood Policy Technical Assistance Network (SECPTAN) with selected skills and experience were engaged as needed to support the work of the Initiative. The primary role of the consultants was to provide assistance to the network of states as a whole or to groups of states with common issues. The consultations took a variety of formats, including commissioned papers on priority issues and participation at National Meetings and Residency Roundtables. On a selective basis, expert consultants provided on-site consultation to individual states in order to advance their indicator agendas.

Project Management and Funding

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, a multi-issue children's policy organization, is the lead agency for this national initiative. Funding is provided through the generous support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, and the Ford Foundation.

National Partners

  • The National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) 
  • The National Governor's Association (NGA) 
  • The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) 
  • The Education Commission of the States (ECS) 
  • The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) 
  • The State Early Childhood Policy Technical Assistance Network (SECPTAN)
    provides The Initiative with technical counsel. Visit www.finebynine.org for more information.

Too many children enter Kindergarten with physical, social, emotional and cognitive limitations that could have been minimized or eliminated through early attention to child and family needs. Ongoing research confirms that children's readiness for school is multi-faceted, encompassing the whole range of physical, social, emotional and cognitive skills that children need to thrive. Top-notch school readiness indicator systems at the state and local level are necessary to sustain current investments in the most effective programs for children and to make the case for increased investments to improve outcomes for young children and their families.


School Readiness Indicators: Making Progress for Young Children was a multi-state initiative that used child and well-being indicators to build a change agenda in states and local communities in order to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. The task of participating states was to develop a set of child outcome and systems indicators for children from birth through the fourth-grade reading test, an important red flag for children most at-risk for poor long-term outcomes, such as dropping out of school, teen pregnancy and juvenile crime.

  • Objective 1: To create a set of measurable indicators related to and defining school readiness that can be tracked regularly over time at the state an local levels.
  • Objective 2: To have states and local governments adopt this indicators-based definition of school readiness, fill in gaps in data availability, track data over time and report findings to their citizens.
  • Objective 3: To stimulate policy, program and other actions to improve the ability of all children to read at grade level by the end of the third grade.

The school readiness indicators that were developed are comprehensive and practical. Indicators that were tracked at the state level and in local communities in order to monitor the capacity of child and family programs to meet the variable needs that exist across communities. Indicators reflect state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes. The Indicators are broad enough to present a picture of the whole child, including children health status, what children know and can do, children's mental and emotional health and children's economic well-being. Indicators have been developed to fill the gap in knowledge between the child's status at birth and their status at school entry.

Click here to download the complete summary of The School Readiness Indicators Initiative.

Participating States

ARIZONA

Arizona Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Early Childhood Block Grant - state funds support preschool programs for economically disadvantaged children.
  • Healthy Families - offers home visits to struggling families including: practical help for employment and child care, emotional support, and training in parenting and coping skills to prevent child abuse and neglect and improve the stability of the family. The budget for Healthy Families was doubled in fiscal year 2005 to reach more than 4,400 families.
  • K-3 Reading legislation - expands the requirements for school districts and charter schools to provide quality reading instruction. The law requires districts to assess student progress in reading and plan effective interventions. Districts must also conduct curriculum evaluations and teacher training. Any pupil in third grade who does not meet or exceed reading standards shall be provided with intensive reading instruction.
  • Arizona Learns Initiative - establishes four accountability classifications for schools and requires the Arizona Department of Education to define them using specific measures: excelling, highly performing, performing or under performing. The designations will be publicized. Governing boards are required to implement school improvement plans for under performing and the state department of education provides teams to assist.
  • Child Care Subsidies - Since March 2003 thousands of families have been turned away from child care due to funding shortfalls. Without help for child care, parents are forced to quit their jobs, turn to welfare or leave their children in unsafe situations. The budget adopted for 2005 adds $51 million for child care, reaches more working families and reduces the waiting list. A waiting list of approximately 6,200 children will remain. 
  • Full-Day Kindergarten - The legislative voted to adopt Governor Napolitano's proposal to expand access to voluntary full-day kindergarten. Starting in August 2004, $25 million in state funding will support full-day kindergarten in schools that have at least 90% of the students eligible for the federal school lunch program. By December 2004, a study committee will recommend how to fund and expand the program statewide by 2010.

The Arizona Board on School Readiness
The State Board on School Readiness was created by Executive Order in August 2002 to reduce duplication and fragmentation, leverage public and private investment and advise the Governor and legislature on effective strategies so that more Arizona children start school ready to succeed.

The board consists of members appointed by the Governor, including state agency directors, members of the legislature, early care and education professionals and community/business leaders. The State School Readiness Board priority recommendations were used to develop Governor Napolitano's 5-year school readiness action plan.

Policy Issues

  • Provide sufficient funding to serve all eligible applicants for child care subsidies with no waiting list
  • Increase child care subsidy rates to the most current market rate survey
  • Include preschools, Head Start and Full-day K students in the funding formula for facilities and capital improvements of public schools
  • Increase availability of voluntary access to Pre-K programs
  • Expand availability of Full-day K

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Governor's Division for Children is a government entity with a staff appointed by the Governor's office. The office acts as a clearinghouse for information relating to children, in addition to coordinating funding for a variety of research projects and direct services such as Head Start and afterschool programs. The staff has individual areas of expertise (e.g. juvenile justice). Staff of this office also participates in other government commissions; many of these commissions have private sector partners. Due to federal funding requirements, the Division for Children is currently focusing on issues of juvenile justice.

Arizona School Readiness Report
Access Measuring School Readiness: How do we know when we're on track? by clicking here.

ARKANSAS

Arkansas Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • The School Readiness Initiative Partnership has established an outstanding coalition of state and non-profit agencies. This partnership has defined and targeted Arkansas School Readiness Indicators consisting of Ready Children, Ready Families, Ready Schools and Ready Communities. These indicators will be tracked regularly over time at state and local levels. A Getting Ready For School data report and a Kindergarten Readiness Checklist brochure have been published identifying the indicators for the state.

Policy Issues
  • Act 49 of 2004 declared that $40 million go to preschool in the new funding formula for Arkansas' educational system.
  • Act 35 of 2003 of the 2nd Extraordinary Sesson of the Arkansas 84th General Assembly requires the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) to implement a developmentally appropriate uniform school readiness screening and establish a concise system of reporting the performance. Beginning with the 2004-2005 school year, the ADE shall require all school districts to administer a statewide uniform school readiness screening to each kindergarten student upon entry of school. The state mandated screening tool will be administred within a given time frame.
  • Act 1332 of 2003 created Arkansas Better Chance for School Success, an expansion of the state-funded preschool program. The money to fund education reform will come from the following bills:
  • HB1030 (a 7/8 percentage point increase in the sales tax, extending the sales tax to selected services, tax on vending machine operations), $82 million collected during the rest of fiscal year 2004 due to an emergency clause, $364 million during fiscal year 2005.
  • SB 80 (increase of corportae franchise tax) $6 million during fiscal year 2005, $25 milion-growth in propoerty tax collection from increased assessments and $22 million natural growth from general revenue.
  • ABC is a publicly funded preschool program for 3 and 4 year-old children who are characterized as at-risk of school failure. Act 1332 enables more children to be served in the ABC program and states that "consideration for funding shall first go to communities in which schools have low performance-75% below proficient on Math and Literacy, in academic distress and/or high poverty leves, raised from 156% to 200%" (FPL).
  • Any willing provider (or school) may apply. Those funded must have State Quality Approval status, a P-4 licensed teacher as lead teacher and CDA credentialed aide and 1:10 ratio in the classroom. A logitudinal study is being initiated, students will be tracked through a standardized assessment from entry into the program until 4th grade and all programs will utilize the kindergarten readiness screening.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Governor's Partnership Council for Children and Families was was disbanded a few years ago. No new group has been appointed to continue their work.

CALIFORNIA

California Indicator List 

Highlights of the State

  • The California Children and Families Commission (CCFC) and the 58 county Children and Families Commissions direct a fund of tobacco tax revenues to services for children birth to age five.
  • CCFC has made school readiness its framework for funding and evaluation. CCFC identified five focus areas within school readiness: early mental health, informal child care, migrant/seasonal population, children with special needs and oral health.
  • CCFC's School Readiness Initiative includes a $200 million fund that, with an equal match from counties, targets families and children in low-performing school communities.
  • The Legislature's Education Master Plan, for the first time, includes a School Readiness component with recommendations to expand and integrate early care and education into the K-12 education system.
  • The California Department of Education, Child Development Division has revised its approach to evaluating the child care and development services it provides to move away from a process-oriented compliance model and towards a focus on the results desired from the system. "Desired Results for Children and Families" centers around the following six goals for children and families: Children are personally and socially competent; Children are effective learners; Children show physical and motor competence; Children are safe and healthy; Families support their child's learning and development; Families achieve their goals.

Policy Issues

  • Making progress on children's school readiness in the context of severely declining state revenues
  • Addressing how to serve more children who are eligible for subsidized child care and how to improve quality in child care settings overall
  • Assuring access to health care for all children
  • Family leave legislation
  • Addressing culturally diverse children/families
  • Addressing special needs children/families
  • Kindergarten assessments

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The California Children and Families Commission was created by The California Children and Families Act of 1998. The Commission was designed to provide, on a community-by-community basis, all children prenatal to five years of age with a comprehensive, integrated system of early childhood development services. Through the integration of health care, quality child care, parent education and effective intervention programs for families at risk, children and their parents and caregivers are provided with the tools necessary to foster secure, healthy and loving attachments. Commissioners are appointed from the public and private sector, including state legislators, representatives from the Department of Education, doctors, and actors. The Commissioners meet monthly.


COLORADO

Colorado Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Children who have attended the Colorado preschool program have been tracked and have higher 2nd and 3rd grade math, reading and writing scores. We are closing the achievement gap for high risk kids.
  • Implementation of a school readiness bill to improve ECE in low performing elementary schools.
  • Ready to Succeed Partnership leads Denver metro initiative with seven partners. Developed indicators and tracking changes over five years.
  • Use of tobacco settlement funds to bring nurse home visitation program to Colorado.

Policy Issues

  • Implement the comprehensive plan of the Colorado Child Care Commission (the plan is in the works and first of ten established goals is (All children will enter school ready to succeed).
  • Sustain funding for ECE programs (Colorado preschool program, Tony Grampsas Intervention Fund, etc.).
  • Support and expand mental health services for families with young children.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Colorado Child Care Commission was created in 2000 by legislation written by child advocates. The Commission consists of 6 legislators and 9 governor appointees. Its charge over the next three years is to study the role of government in child care issues and develop a long range plan for the state.

Colorado School Readiness
Access Colorado's School Readiness Indicators; Making Progress for Young Children, by clicking here.

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • We reformed the child care subsidy program, raising rates for licensed care, accredited programs and children with special needs. The program is more family and provider friendly.

Policy Issues

  • Higher rates/funding for pre-K and state-funded centers.
  • Maintenance or expansion of funding and eligibility in state child care subsidy program.
  • Compensation and training initiatives for caregivers.
  • Consultation on health, mental health, education and disabilities for childcare providers.
  • Changing licensors' relationship to childcare providers.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Commission on Children was founded in 1985 by an act of the Connecticut Legislature. This bipartisan commission works to oversee matters concerning children and youth. The Commission brings representatives from the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government together with the private sector to promote public policies in children's best interest. Both public and private sector representatives serve on the commission.

Mandates include: assessing and coordinating state programs affecting children;
annually reviewing the statutes concerning children and report findings to the Governor and Legislature; meeting with representatives of the executive and judicial branches to review their respective responsibilities and to receive recommendations for study;
meeting with private providers of services to children, foster parents and support groups to understand their concerns and to receive recommendations for study;
receiving legislative request for study; enlisting the support of the leaders of the business and education communities, state and local governments and the media to improve the daily delivery system; state budget process and state polices concerning children; and serving as a liaison between government and private groups concerned with children.

Connecticut School Readiness Report
Access Keeping Children on the Path to School Success: How is Connecticut Doing? by clicking here.

KANSAS

Kansas Indicator List

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Children's Cabinet disperses the state's tobacco settlement funds to early childhood programs such as Smart Start and Head Start. The Cabinet has approximately 20 members, including state legislators, state department officials (directors or their designee), representatives from the state's judicial branch, educators, and members of the business community.

KENTUCKY

Kentucky Indicator List

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Early Childhood Development Authority is Kentucky's statutory children's group. The cabinet secretaries from Health Services, Families and Children, Education, Arts and the Humanities, all serve on the Authority along with judge executive, mayor, legislators, higher education, foundations, labor, citizens at large representing the Urban League, United Way of Kentucky, Business, Planning Commission. Kentucky also has a Professional Development Council and an Early Childhood Business Council. However, all of the recommendations must go to the Early Childhood Development Authority for approval.

MAINE

Maine Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Maine has been selected to be part of the National Infant and Toddler Child Care Initiative designed to provide technical assistance, consultation and resources to states to support efforts to effect system-wide improvements in infant and toddler child care. Maine is developing a plan of work that includes: developing Learning Results for children 0 to 3 years of age, improving the quality of infant care and increasing the availability of infant and toddler care in all areas of the state.
  • The Maine Child Care Advisory Concil is working with the University of Maine System to increase access to Bachelor's degree programs in Early Care and Education.
  • Universal access to quality early care and education will be a focal issue of the Early Childhood Task Force (Comprehensive Systems Grant).
  • Maine's School Readiness Indicator (SRI) Project is connected with the state's Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) grant. The final indicators selected in the SRI project will be used as appropriate to monitor desired outcomes from the implementation of the system changes as outlined in the ECCS plan.
  • Maine's mental health and human service agencies are merging into one Department on July 1, 2004. The new Department is titled the Department of Health and Human Services. The Commissioner of the new department, John R. Nicholas, was confirmed in late April 2004. The proposed detailed structure of the new department will be presented to the legislature in January 2005.

Policy Issues

  • Implementation of Maine's Dirigo Health Plan.Controlling costs, improving quality and ensuring access-the Dirigo Health Reform Act is a market-based solution to address rising health care costs, improve quality of care and provide access to coverage for Maine's uninsured. This public-private partnership will create an affordable health plan and invest in public health and disease prevention to assure every man, woman and child in Maine has affordable quality care through a reliable and accessible health care system.
  • Maintain and, if possible, expand access to child care subsidy program for low income working families while improving quality of child care programs.
  • Develop plan for universal access to four-year old kindergarten through collaboration among K-12 school districts and local child care/Head Start programs.
  • Maintain and, if possible, expand access to Early Head Start and Head Start
  • Improving preschool teacher preparation by considering revisions to preschool certification and working with higher education to improve access and relevance of preschool teacher preparation.
  • Support and expand mental health services for families with young children.
  • Addition of the Commissioner of Labor to the Children's Cabinet via statutory language.
  • Development of a Department of Health and Human Services which merges the formerly independent departments of mental health and human services.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - Children's Cabinet. Governor Angus King established the Children's Cabinet in 1995 to oversee and coordinate the delivery of services to children in Maine. The Children's Cabinet is composed of the departments directly related to children and families: Corrections, Education, Human Services, Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services, and Public Safety.

The Children's Cabinet actively collaborates to create and promote coordinated policies and service delivery systems that support children, families and communities. The Cabinet has six goals: To collaborate actively to share resources and remove barriers, to support collaborative initiatives that prevent health and behavioral problems in children and youth, to conduct long range planning and policy development leading to a more effective public and private service delivery system, to coordinate the delivery of residential and community-based children’s services among the agencies, to assess resource capacity and allocations, to improve policies and programs through the review of specific case examples.

Maine School Readiness Report
Access Maine's Recommendations for Core Indicators of School Readiness by clicking here.

MASSACHUSETTS

Massachusetts Indicator List
Highlights of the State

  • Massachusetts is showing its commitment to children and families in several ways, most recently through the Early Education and Care Council. This body is comprised of Commissioners from three state agencies: the Department of Education, Department of Public Health and the Office of Child Care Services all striving to develop a comprehensive plan to coordinate, integrate and streamline publicly funded early education and care. This council is a great example of how Massachusetts is working to bring together departments who commonly work with the same populations.
  • Still very much in the works is the School Readiness Indicators Project (SRIP), forged from the 2001 report titled School Readiness in Massachusetts: A Report of the Governor's Commission on School Readiness. With high-level support from the Executive Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS) and under the direction of the Office of Child Care Services (OCCS), Massachusetts has identified 35 indicators it believes will help demonstrate how well we support families and help our children succeed.
  • Massachusetts is pleased to embark on this process involving collaboration between multiple public and private agencies already working for the betterment of its children and families. For the first time in state history different agencies are working together, sharing information and centralizing their missions to give young children the best opportunities for learning possible.
  • Our indicators will eventually help us create a "report card", not for the children themselves but for us, as policy makers, providers, families and citizens. We want to know what works and what doesn't in order to make changes and increase our efforts where needed. Massachusetts understands that this is a learning process for everyone involved and we hope to create a flexible model that can adjust to the changing future.

Policy Issues

The policy issues for the state are complex and involve multiple parties. Our top priorities are children and their families and these issues reflect that commitment:
  • Improve state and local coordination and oversight of early education and care programs and services
  • Increase alignment of policies and operations
  • Strengthen parent education and involvement
  • Create an effective data collection system to inform policy and program planning and development
  • Establish the appropriate balance between funding for direct service, quality enhancement and administration
  • Ensure the creation of a workforce system to support the education, training and compensation of teachers

Statutory Children's Cabinet - Massachusetts has no statutory children's group.

Click here to view Massachusetts' School Readiness Indicator Project.

MISSOURI

Missouri Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Missouri is the birth place of the nationally acclaimed Parents As Teachers program, as well as the first state to create an accreditation system for child care, which predates the national accrediting organizations. In 1997, Missouri passed legislation that created the Early Care and Education Fund, which channels gaming proceeds to support quality early learning. These funds have allowed Missouri to create additional quality child care spaces across the state, provide incentives and assistance for accreditation, invest in state-funded Early Head Start, and create an innovative Stay At Home Parent support structure.

Policy Issues

  • Creating a statewide Early Childhood Authority.
  • Creating a cohesive early learning system for all Missouri children.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Children's Services Commission. Missouri has a longstanding statutory children's group, the Children's Services Commission, which has a mandate to integrate state funding to improve services for children. The group is comprised of cabinet level officials and key legislators. The group has been a vehicle for interagency collaboration and shared visioning. Missouri has been a leader in developing partnerships between the public and private sectors and with communities to improve outcomes for children through the executive ordered Family and Community Trust Board, which works with community partnerships across the state to improve outcomes for children. There is interest is establishing a statewide entity with responsibility and authority to weave Missouri's cadre of strong programs into a statewide system of early learning. The Missouri School Readiness Indicators team and its product will be important in moving this agenda forward.

Missouri School Readiness Report
Access Ready or Not, Here We Grow! by clicking here.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

New Hampshire Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • New Hampshire's School Readiness report was released last spring in a series of presentations including the following audiences: NH State Board of Education, the Legislative Caucus for Young Children and the NH Child Care Advisory Council.
  • The National release of Getting Ready, Findings from the National School Readiness Indicators Initiative, A 17 State Partnership presents an opportunity for letters to the editor from the Children's Alliance in light of current proposed education standards being reviewed in the coming weeks, which include mandating kindergarten.
  • State funds CHIP (Healthy Kids NH) for first time; rate of uninsured children halved in three years.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder and two eating disorders -- anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, were added to the list of biologically based mental illnesses for which health insurers must cover treatment. Coverage also required for some in- and out-patient substance-abuse detoxification and rehabilitation, and services provided by licensed alcohol and drug counselors.
  • Statewide home visiting program initiated to serve women through pregnancy and until their baby's first birthday.
  • The third edition of two parenting manuals was made available: Healthy Mom/Healthy Baby and Growing Up Healthy, being distributed by hospitals and family resource centers, mostly to parents of newborns.
  • A statewide campaign, Early Learning Lasts a Lifetime, (ELLAL) was launched by the governor's Kids Cabinet and four core partners -- NH Business Partners for Early Learning, NH Police Chiefs Assn., NH Pediatric Society, and NH National Guard. Through a media campaign and a series of community forums, ELLAL aims to raise awareness about the importance of the early years to a child's later success in school and in life and mobilize state and local action to improve early learning across the state.
  • Child Development Bureau is developing a core of high-quality early childhood professors to mentor less-experienced teachers.
  • Homeless children can now attend the school they attended when they became homeless.
  •  Parent training and information workshops conducted for parents of children with disabilities. Topics include special education laws and the IEP process, parent-school collaboration, early intervention, disability awareness and transition from high school.
  • 108 communities enrolled in the Best Schools Leadership Institute, an initiative developed to foster stronger community and parent involvement in school improvement efforts. 
  • State developing standardized protocol for interviewing, investigating and assessing child abuse cases. Attorney General has made training of such teams a priority.
  • $5 million bond appropriated for the state housing finance authority to support affordable housing. 
  • Child care benefits extended for mothers who previously saw those benefits stop when their TANF grant did. Now, parents whose income exceeds TANF limits but who remain eligible for extended medical assistance (EMA) can still receive child-care reimbursement at the top rate.

Policy Issues

  • Need fair and sustainable method of funding quality state public education.
  • Need to offer universal, voluntary preschool and kindergarten.
  • Full funding and accreditation of child protection system.
  • Outreach to the estimated 15,000 uninsured children eligible for CHIP.
  • Development of affordable housing throughout the state.
  •  Increase Medicaid reimbursements to health care (physical, mental and oral) providers.
  • Extend unemployment insurance to workers who can work only part-time because they need to care for their child.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Kids Cabinet. In the Fall of 2001, Governor Jeanne Shaheen formed the Kids Cabinet, bringing together officials from the highest levels of state government to focus on improving the lives of New Hampshire's children. The Cabinet is currently working on a number of issues, including:
- Improving the quality, affordability and availability of child care.
- Improving the quality, affordability and availability of after-school care.
- Increasing the number of children who have health coverage.
- Reducing the rates of youth substance abuse and sexual activity.
- Helping parents help their children through parent-support activities.

Members of the Cabinet include the Commissioners of the Departments of Health and Human Services, Education, Employment Security, Safety and Corrections; the Attorney General; the Coordinator of the New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency; the Adjutant General and the Administrative Justice of the District and Municipal courts.

New Hampshire School Readiness Report
Access Ready, Set, Grow; Investing in Quality Early Care and Education for a Thriving New Hampshire by clicking here.

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • The New Jersey Supreme Court, in Abbott vs. Burke, mandated the availability of free, high quality preschool for all 3 and 4 year olds in the state's 30 poorest school districts, known as Abbott districts. 
  • Legislation passed to provide the next tier of school districts in poverty, known as Early Childhood Program Aid (ECPA) districts, with full day kindergarten and 1/2 day programs for 4 year olds.
  • Set standards for quality in early education programs for 3 and 4 year-olds that far exceed licensing standards for child care, adopted by New Jersey Supreme Court as standard.
  • About $330 million in funding for preschool programs.

Policy Issues

  • Implementation has been an issue for the Abbott and ECPA programs, including adequate facilities, adequate funding, collaboration between community providers and school districts, and teacher preparation. 
  • Although the Abbott decision provides a spring board to universal preschool, and ultimately could redefine early care education for children ages 0-5, to date it has eclipsed services for children ages 0-3.
  • Improving preschool teacher preparation by considering revisions to preschool certification and working with higher education to improve access and relevance of preschool teacher preparation
  • Providing appropriate and sufficient number of preschool facilities
  • Creating infrastructures for partnerships on the state and local level

Statutory Children's Cabinet - New Jersey has no statutory children's group.

New Jersey School Readiness Report
Access Building the Future; Readying Our Youngest Citizens for School Success by clicking here.

OHIO

Ohio Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • In Ohio, more than 30% of the 130,000 children who enter kindergarten each year require some type of intervention service. Early learning professionals throughout the state recognize that if roadblocks to learning and healthy development can be identified in children earlier, chances for their increased success in school can be improved. For this purpose, Ohio joined the National School Readiness Indicators Intiative: Making Progress for Young Children in November 2002.
  • Contributing to the school readiness initiative was the work of Governor Taft's Ohio Family and Children First Council, which identified a set of well-being indicators for children from birth through young adulthood. With a focus on children from birth through grade three, Ohio moved forward in defining Ohio's indicators relative to school readiness.
  • A statewide taskforce comprised of all state agencies that work with young children and their families as well as advocacy and community-based organizations was convened. Its work was conducted in several phases:
  1. Phase One: Taskforce members heard presentations and different perspectives about school readiness and the supporting research. They also examined related national, state and local initiatives and data collection efforts.
  2. Phase Two: Regional forums were held to increase public awareness regarding readiness and solicit stakeholder input regarding indicators that are essential to local communities. The taskforce used input from these forums to select Ohio's indicators. The state departments of Education, Mental Health, and Job and Family Services jointly committed to collecting data on these important measures of school readiness.

Next Steps

  • State agencies will produce annual reports summarizing progress on the school readiness indicators identified in 2005. The information will inform a number of efforts aimed at developing a statewide, comprehensive and coordinated early learning system (see Ohio Articles and Reports). It will also guide recommendations for making important health, education and mental health services accessible and affordable to families in need, as well as all families who want the best for their young children.

Ohio School Readiness Report
Access Ohio School Readiness Initiative by clicking here.

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Rhode Island has the fewest uninsured children of any state in the US.
  • Rhode Island has the best rate of access to prenatal care in the US.

Policy Issues

  • Maintaining health care benefits under RIte Care for children
  • Measuring child care quality
  • Expanding access to full-day kindergarten programs
  • Sustaining state investments in child care subsidies
  • Increasing availability of affordable housing

Statutory Children's Cabinet - The Rhode Island Children's Cabinet was created in 1991 by state law. The cabinet functions as an information exchange forum among state departments, private service agencies and the public. Quarterly meetings are attended by state Department Directors; monthly meetings are conducted as work groups made up of senior departmental policy staff on an ad-hoc basis.

The Children's Cabinet committed itself to working toward four broad outcomes:

  1. All children will enter school ready to learn.
  2. All youth will leave school prepared to lead productive lives.
  3. All children and youth will be safe in their homes, schools, and neighborhoods.
  4. All families shall be economically self-sufficient yet interdependent.
The Cabinet is composed of the directors of the state departments that serve children: Human Services; Health; Children, Youth and Families; Labor and Training; Administration; Mental Health, Retardation and Hospitals; Higher Education; and Elementary and Secondary Education. The Cabinet also includes the Governor's Policy Director and the Rhode Island Child Support Enforcement Administrator. There are no private sector representatives.

Rhode Island School Readiness
  • Access Benchmarks for Progress: Preparing Rhode Island's Children to Succeed in School by clicking here.
  • Access Benchmarks for Progress: Preparing Rhode Island's Children to Succeed in School, a Companion Report by clicking here.

VERMONT

Vermont Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Development of kindergarten survey
  • Healthy child care in Vermont
  • Pediatricians' involvement in children's school success
  • Fall study tours and legislative teas to raise community awareness
  • Early Childhood Day in legislature
  • Career lattice/apprenticeship program
  • Health/evaluation/human services coordination
  • Research partnership work and its connection to legislature
  • Touchpoints more than 500 people trained Children's Upstream Services (CUPs) as support for mental health

Policy Issues

  • Universal access to early care and education
  • Funding for annual kindergarten readiness survey
  • Assure universal access to health care (medical home, smooth referrals to sub-specialties which need to be available in the community, developmental screenings/treatment, services for vulnerable families [mental health, SA and DV services for parents], and system for children with special health care needs)

Statutory Children's Cabinet - Governor's Children and Youth Cabinet
Gov. Howard Dean announced the appointment of the Governor's Children and Youth Cabinet in February, 2002. The cabinet, which is comprised of up to 17 members, will submit a "How are the Children" report annually to the Governor and the General Assembly. In addition, the group will monitor the well-being of Vermont's children, improve the policies relating to children's services, and coordinate services.

The cabinet is chaired by the Secretary of the Human Services Agency, and meets four times annually. Members include the commissioners of: Education; Employment and Training; Health; Social and Rehabilitation Services; Corrections; Prevention, Assistance, Transition and Health Access; Public Safety; and Developmental and Mental Health Services. Also on the panel will be representatives of the Governor's office and the Administration Agency. The court Administrator and up to three judges can serve, as well as a member of each the Vermont House and the Senate.

Vermont School Readiness Briefs

VIRGINIA

Virginia Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Governor Warner's Foundations for a Lifetime Initiative: Governor Mark Warner launched in the fall of 2003 "Foundations for a Lifetime", an early childhood initiative with four major components: early care and school readiness; family support; maternal and child health and nutrition, and early childhood infrastructure and coordination. Included in this initiative were projects to raise current child care center standards and family day-care home standards; raise child care subsidy rates; develop a tiered reimbursement system to reward high-quality care; establish a coordinated system for the professional development of child care providers; enhance support for home visitor programs; develop a web-based and a 24 hour phone line for information about early childhood development; develop and distribute New Parent Tool Kits; improve child nutrition and immunization rates and work to prevent child asthma and obesity; enhance newborn screenings; and improve the cordination of early childhood programs in Virginia. Governor Warner is planning a Governor's Summit on Early Care and Education for May 2005 with events for the corporate community as well as the early care and education community.
  • Maternal Child Health Block Grant-Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant: The Virginia Department of Health received a grant for developing an early childhood comprehensive system--the Virginia Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (VECCS) Planning Grant. Four Committees (Early Care and Education; Family Education and Famly Support; Medical Homes; and Social/Emotional and Mental Health) have been meeting to work on a state system for early childhood programs. The work of the four committees will be meshed into a comprehensive state plan in April 2005.
  • School Readiness Indicators State Team: The School Readiness Indicators State Team, chaired by the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, has met for two years to develop indicators of school readiness in Virginia. Governor Warner released No Time to Waste: Indicators of School Readiness 2004 Data Book in March of 2004. The State Team developed a policy agenda for 2004/2005 based on findings from the indicators. Prenatal care/low birth weight babies and coordination of Head Start and At-risk four-year old programs were selected as priority policy areas. There has been significant work in both areas in the past few months.
  • Virginia Preschool Initiative (VPI): The Virginia Preschool Initiative served 5, 886 at-risk 4 year olds in the 2003-2004 school year. State funds are allocated to fund services to 60% of Virginia's at-risk 4 year olds not being served by Title I or Head Start. The 2004 Virginia General Assembly appropriated $6.7 million in new funding over the next biennium for VPI, to cover all at-risk four-year olds not served by Head Start.
  • TEACH-VA: The TEACH-VA program received state funding for the first time in 2003. TEACH-VA, now using both public and private funds, has provided scholarships to over 300 child care providers attending community college programs in early care and development.
  • Virginia Child Care Resource and Referral Network: The Virginia Child Care Resource and Referral Network (VACCRRN) received state funding for the first time in 2003. VACCRRN now has an Executive Director to help coordinate the offices located throughout the Commonwealth.
  • Virginia's SCHIP Program (Children's Health Insurance for Low-Income Families): Under Governor Warner's Leadership, significant improvements have been made to Virginia's health insurance programs for children, resulting in approximately 90% of estimated eligible children being enrolled. Policy improvements have included streamlining the state's SCHIP and Medicaid programs into one program called FAMIS, greatly enhancing local outreach efforts, simplifying the enrollment process, and expanding mental health benefits to enrollees.

Virginia's Better Baby Care Initiative:
Virginia participated in the National Infant and Toddler Child Care Initiative and held meetings of a Better Baby Care Coalition. The Virginia Department of Social Services is participating in an Infant and Toddler Care grant and has combined this project with the Virginia Department of Health's VECCS initiative (see description above)

Policy Issues

  • The Virginia State Team developed policy goals to 1) increase access to prenatal care and lower the number of low birthweight babies and to 2) better coordinate Head Start and the Virginia Preschool Initiative.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - Virginia has no statutory children's group.

Virginia School Readiness Report
Access No Time to Waste, Indicators of School Readiness by clicking here.

WISCONSIN

Wisconsin Indicator List

Highlights of the State

  • Early Education Matters - The Wisconsin Council on Children and Families (WCCF) and partners Milwaukee Public Schools, the Wisconsin Child Care Research Partnership at UW-Extension and the Wisconsin Early Childhood Association (WECA) received a grant from the Joyce Foundation for a two year project to expand the quality and quantity of early education experiences available to Wisconsin's 4-year olds. Other partners involved in the project include representatives from Head Start, Wisconsin Child Care Resource and Referral Network and the Department of Public Instruction.
  • Approximately 10 communities will be selected to receive small grants for planning efforts around community approaches to four-year-old kindergarten. Grants will only be available in districts that do not have universal four-year-old kindergarten (Communities that have early childhood special education or are in the start-up process will be eligible). Planning must involve public school representatives as well as representatives from local early care and education (child care providers, Head Start, private pre-schools, etc.). In addition to the grants, communities can take part in research, training and technical assistance opportunities.
  • Kids First- In early May, the Governor presented "KidsFirst: The Governor's Plan to Invest in Wisconsin's Future". Developed with the first lady, the superintendent of DPI, and secretaries of DHFS, DWD, and DOC, highlights of the four-part plan include the promotion of:
  1.  Kids that are Ready for Success by: Rating the quality of child care providers to aid parental choice and providing financial incentives for quality programs, Promoting quality child care by additional funding for the TEACH and REWARD programs, Fully funding 4-year-old kindergarten plus incentives to communities that integrate early education services
  2. Safe Kids at home, in school and in their communities by: For foster care, increasing benefit rates and providing subsidies for certain relative guardians, promoting early attention to health care needs and providing those leaving foster care after high school with health care coverage and job training, In the child welfare system, providing added resources to counties with higher turnover rates and training needs, designating an ombudsman for Milwaukee County, establishing a statewide, proactive review system, developing a workforce from within targeted communities and targeting grants toward integrated community-based services, Providing added resources to reduce child and family violence and services to help children who witness domestic abuse, Promoting a safe-routes-to-school initiative for Milwaukee, Raising Wisconsin's child passenger safety standards
  3. Kids with the opportunity to be raised in Strong Families by: Initiating a home visiting program for all new parents with information about nutrition, parenting and available services, Developing local, collaborative projects focusing on W-2, child welfare and substance abuse and mental health systems, Expanding the Children First program and otherwise improving child support enforcement efforts, Helping children of incarcerated parents by an enhanced community transition program, increased parent education while in prison, priority placement to parents in the Female Alternative to Prison program, assistance to relatives caring for children, and expanded mentoring and school-based support programs for children.
  4. Healthy Kids by: Providing grants to agencies and groups to identify and enroll low-income families in Medicaid, Providing Medicaid coverage of sealants and fluoride treatments, certifying dental hygienists as Medicaid providers, and appointing a task force to address the lack of available dental care for Wisconsin's low-income children, Targeting immunization efforts to areas where numbers of children immunized is low, Providing grants to schools to help cover start-up costs for school breakfast programs and increase per meal subsidies, Increasing food stamp outreach and expanding access via the internet and to Spanish-Hmong-and Russian-speaking families, Continuing support of the Family Planning Waiver which provides pregnancy prevention and reproductive health services to adolescents, Promoting a "healthy start" for kids by providing BadgerCare coverage of prenatal care for undocumented immigrants, providing W-2 benefits to eligible, first time, at-risk pregnant women in their third trimester, and extending the W-2 work exemption for parents of infants from three to six months, Expanding initiatives to prevent lead poisoning, fight asthma and reduce tobacco use by youth and pregnant women
Governor's Task Force on Education Excellence - The task force was charged with studying and making recommendations regarding the cost of providing a great education to every child in Wisconsin and determine the level at which Wisconsin citizens are prepared to fund that education; and
  • Reviewing how the state funds education through a combination of state and local taxes and make recommendations regarding what proportion of these two taxes is fair and reasonable to fund public education; and 
  • Improve the state's ability to attract, recruit, train and retain high quality teachers so that every child and every classroom has a highly qualified teacher, including ways to increase compensation to attract our best young students to the profession, keep our experienced teachers in the profession and align our best teachers with the toughest challenges; and
  • Consider and recommend ways to adequately fund special education; and 
  • Review existing barriers to academic achievement in Wisconsin; and
  • Study Wisconsin's current investments in early childhood education and recommend ways to make other early investments in education to increase student achievement and accomplish other positive long-term results..

Policy Issues

  • Maintain and, if possible, expand BadgerCare, Wisconsin's health insurance program for low income working families that uses federal SCHIP appropriations as allowed by waiver.
  • Maintain and, if possible, expand access to Wisconsin Shares, Wisconsin's child care subsidy program for low income working families.
  • Achieve universal access to four-year old kindergarten through collaboration among K-12 school districts and local child care/Head Start programs.
  • Provide the full-range of mandated EPSDT services to all eligible children.

Statutory Children's Cabinet - Wisconsin has no statutory children's group.

Wisconsin School Readiness Report
Access Wisconsin School Readiness Initiative: The Status of School Readiness Indicators in Wisconsin by clicking here.

Access Ready Kids, Ready Schools, Ready Communities; Measuring School Readiness in Wisconsin by clicking here.


Reports & Articles

Meetings & Materials

First National Meeting - October 2001

Our first National Meeting was held October 22 - 24, 2001 in Newport, Rhode Island. 

Meeting Objectives:

  • To explore how to best use child development research to make more informed policy and program decisions within states.
  • To consider a set of school readiness indicators that reflect child outcomes (physical health, social and emotional development, and cognitive skills) as well as systems outcomes (state policies and programs that affect young children and families).
  • To identify ways that child well-being indicators can be used to shape a policy agenda that improves outcomes for children and families.
  • To share strategies for communicating with policymakers, community leaders, and the public in order to improve child well-being in states and communities.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Residency Roundtable: Indicators of Social and Emotional Development of Young Children - April 2002

Our first Residency Roundtable was held April 10 – 11, 2002 in New York City. The topic was indicators of social and emotional development. 

Meeting Objectives:

  • To identify the issues that are critical to the healthy social and emotional development of young children, including family environment, community conditions, child characteristics, and service systems for young children and their families. 
  • To develop a set of school readiness indicators that reflect child outcomes (healthy social and emotional development of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and early elementary school children) as well as systems outcomes (state policies and programs that affect the social and emotional development of young children and families). 
  • To select core indicators to track progress in supporting the healthy social and emotional development of young children from birth to age 8. 
  • To identify potential data sources for indicators of the healthy social and emotional development of young children. 
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Second National Meeting - May 2002

Our second National Meeting was held October May 6 - 7, 2002 in Newport, Rhode Island. 

Meeting Objectives:

  • To develop a set of core indicators of school readiness to track progress for young children and families in the states. 
  • To share state work on additional indicators (core plus) of school readiness in order to inform state policy and program development.
  • To formulate state-specific strategies to gather data and use indicators to influence policy. 
  • To present outcomes from the first Residency Roundtable on indicators of social and emotional development.
  • To share strategies for communicating with policymakers, community leaders, and the public in order to improve child well-being in states and communities. 
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Residency Roundtable: Language and Literacy - September 2002

This meeting was the second in a series of small work sessions to help states make accelerated progress in selecting and/or developing school readiness indicators in priority areas. Participants included state agency data and policy staff from Early Intervention, Early Childhood, Education, Health, Human Services and Governor's Offices as well as state school readiness team members from child policy organizations, universities, and Head Start. The roundtable focused on indicators related to the healthy language and literacy development of children from birth to age eight. The indicators reflect state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes.

Meeting Objectives:

  • To identify the issues that are critical to the language and literacy development of young children, including family environment, community conditions, child characteristics, and service systems for young children and their families. 
  • To consider a set of school readiness indicators that reflect child outcomes (language and literacy development of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and early elementary school children) as well as systems outcomes (state policies and programs that affect young children and families). 
  • To select priority indicators to track progress in supporting the language and literacy development of young children from birth to age 8. 
  • To identify potential data sources for indicators of the language and literacy development of young children.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Third National Meeting - November 2002

This was the Third National Meeting of the 17-state initiative to use child well-being indicators to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. Over the course of the Initiative, states will work individually and collectively to develop a comprehensive set of measures to monitor the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and economic well-being of young children. Indicators will reflect state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes. States will develop policy goals and communications strategies to improve school readiness in their states.
Meeting Objectives:
  • To link indicators of school readiness to policy and communication strategies.
  • To highlight state work on school readiness policy issues and kindergarten assessment strategies. 
  • To present outcomes from the second Residency Roundtable on indicators of language and literacy.
  • To share strategies for communicating with policymakers, community leaders and the public in order to create policy change to improve school readiness.
  • To reflect on the first year of the Initiative and plan long-term strategies.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Residency Roundtable: Indicators of Cognition and Approaches to Learning - March 2003

This meeting was the third in a series of small work sessions to help states make accelerated progress in selecting and/or developing school readiness indicators in priority areas. Participants included state agency data and policy staff from state departments including Education, Health, Human Services and Governor's Offices as well as state school readiness team members from child policy organizations, universities, and Head Start. The Roundtable focused on indicators related to children's cognitive development and approaches to learning from birth to age eight. The Roundtable also focused on achievement gaps according to race, income, and ethnicity. Indicators reflected state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes.

Meeting Objectives:

  • Identify issues that are critical to young children's cognitive development and approaches to learning, including family environment, community conditions, child characteristics, and service systems for young children and their families. 
  • Consider a set of school readiness indicators that reflect child outcomes (cognitive development of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and early elementary school children; young children's approaches to learning) as well as systems outcomes (disparities in achievement according to race and income, state policies and programs that affect young children and families). 
  • Select priority indicators to track progress in supporting the cognitive development of young children from birth to age 8. 
  • Identify potential data sources for indicators of the cognitive development of young children and their approaches to learning. 
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Definitions: 

  • Cognition and General Knowledge: This dimension includes multilateral knowledge in three broad areas of academics: reading, mathematics, and general knowledge. Cognitive development is stimulated by children's environment and experiences, which create knowledge regarding similarities, differences, and associations. It also includes knowledge about societal conventions, such as the assignment of particular letters to sounds, and knowledge about shapes, spatial relations, and number concepts. General knowledge is a child's understanding of the world around them.
  • Approaches to Learning: This dimension refers to ways in which kindergartners approach and perform specific tasks in a variety of situations. Individual differences use of skills, knowledge, and capacities reflect children's future attitudes and approaches toward school and learning. Key components include enthusiasm, curiosity, and persistence on tasks, as well as temperament and cultural patterns and values.
  • Achievement Gap: This term refers to disparities in achievement between economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Standardized state and national tests demonstrate unequal academic proficiency between groups of students beginning in elementary school and persisting through high school. These disparities often result in unequal academic and economic opportunities for students according to their race, class, or ethnicity. 

Fourth National Meeting - May 2003

This was the Fourth National Meeting of the 17-state initiative to use child well-being indicators to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. Over the course of the Initiative, states will work individually and collectively to develop a comprehensive set of measures to monitor the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and economic well-being of young children. Indicators will reflect state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes. States will develop policy goals and communications strategies to improve school readiness in their states.
Meeting Objectives:
  • To explore and develop policy strategies for early childhood programs and systems.
  • To highlight state work on school readiness collaboration and policy issues.
  • To expand knowledge in two critical areas: the use of Medicaid to improve health and child development and strategies to support the transition to kindergarten.
  • To provide opportunities for participants to meet in state and cross-state teams to apply information from experts and initiative colleagues to their own state work.
  • To be briefed on outcomes from the Hart Research survey of early elementary professionals' views on school readiness.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Residency Roundtable: Birth to Three - October 2003

This meeting is the fourth in a series of small work sessions to help states make accelerated prgress in selecting and/or developing school readiness indicators in priority areas. Participants include data and policy staff from state departments including Education, Health, Human Services and Governor's Offices as well as state school readiness team members from child policy organizations, universities, Early Intervention programs, Head Start and Early Head Start. The Roundtable will focus on school readiness indicators for children from birth to age three. The Roundtable will define and select indicators relating to a broad array of child outcomes as well as family and community supports and services.

Meeting Objectives:
  • Identify issues that are critical to the development of children from birth to age three, including family environment, community conditions, child characteristics and service systems for young children and their families.
  • Consider a set of school readiness indicators that reflect child outcomes (physical well-being, social and emotional development, language and literacy and cognitive development of infants and toddlers) as well as systems outcomes (disparities in access to services, state policies and programs that affect young children and families).
  • Select priority indicators to track progress in supporting the development of young children from birth to age three.
  • Identify potential data sources of children's school readiness from birth to age three.
  • Please click here for meeting materials

Residency Roundtable Series - January 2004

Fifth National Meeting - December 2003

This is the Fifth National Meeting of the 17-state School Readiness Indicators Initiative which aims to use child-well-being indicators to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. Over the first two and a half years of the Initiative, states have worked individually and collectively to develop comprehensive sets of measures to monitor the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and economic well-being of young children. Between now and the final national meeting of this initiative in May of 2004, states will select a set of indicators that reflect state policy goals and state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes. States will also put in place communications strategies to share their selected set of indicators with policymakers, opinion leaders and the public in order to improve school readiness in their states.

Meeting Objectives:
  • To share state strategies and plans for the final six months of the initiative, including ideas for written indicator products, progress in collecting and analyzing data, communication strategies for the release of school readiness indicators and plans to continue to build an early childhood agenda in the state.
  • To explore and develop policy strategies for early childhood programs and systems.
  • To consider information from the Birth to Three Indicators Residency Roundtable as states develop their set of school readiness indicators.
  • To highlight data successes and to share ideas for solving data challenges in critical policy areas.
  • To provide opportunities for participants to meet in state and cross-state teams to apply information from experts and initiative colleagues to their own state work.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

Final National Meeting - May 2004

This is the sixth and final National Meeting of the 17-state School Readiness Indicators Initiative which aims to use child well-being indicators to improve school readiness and ensure early school success. Over the three years of the initiative, states have worked individually and collectively to develop comprehensive sets of measures to monitor and track progress related to physical, social, emotional, cognitive and economic well-being of young children.

Each state has selected a set of indicators that reflect state policy goals and state investments in programs and policies for young children and families as well as child outcomes. States have also put in place communications strategies to share their selected set of indicators with policymakers, opinion leaders and the public in order to improve school readiness in their states. This final meeting of the 17-state teams will be an opportunity to celebrate achievements, share lessons learned, discuss common indicators and explore ways to sustain an early childhood agenda within states and across the nation.


Meeting Objectives:

  • To share and celebrate each state's school readiness indicator product(s) including indicators, policy agenda and communication strategies.
  • To learn from each other's work and to share successes and challenges.
  • To highlight lessons learned and challenges in using indicators and communications strategies to move an early childhood policy agenda.
  • To develop strategies to sustain promising approaches related to indicators, communications and early childhood policy.
  • To review the indicators that have emerged in each state and explore the possibility of a common set of indicators across states.
  • Please click here for meeting materials.

 

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT works to improve the health, safety, education, economic security, and development of Rhode Island’s children.

Address

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT
One Union Station
Providence, RI 02903

Contact

401-351-9400
401-351-1758
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